Emotional Health

chapter7

It should come as no surprise to anyone that emotional well-being is linked with physical health. Stress hormones, when released over a continuous period of time, have been shown to directly impact cardiovascular disease. But it is not just heart disease that has found to be affected by stress: If you’re happy, stress-free, and relaxed, you’re less likely to suffer from serious conditions such as diabetes and cancer, as well as relatively minor problems such as fatigue, upset stomach, and even the common cold. The bad news is that stress is on the rise.

According to the American Psychological Association, 48 percent of those surveyed in a recent study reported that their stress levels had increased over the last five years. The good news is that we now have more tools than ever to deal with stress. Scientists are conducting numerous studies on how to measure what’s going on in the brain and now claim that optimism and happiness are no longer as elusive as they once were. While it is believed that genetic factors contribute one-third towards our attitude, the rest is up to us. If we choose to be happy in our daily lives, most likely we will be healthier as well. As we make our way on our journey to good health and a long life, let’s consider our trip a relaxing and carefree vacation.  According to experts, optimists tend to experience stressors differently and adapt better to healthy lifestyles; these things lead to a healthier immune system. Among recent major research findings is that happy people are not only healthier and live longer, but they also are more productive at work, have better relationships, and are generally more
well-liked.

A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor’s book.
Irish Proverb

Twitter Digg Delicious Stumbleupon Technorati Facebook

307 Responses to “Emotional Health”